1. Abaca

    Abaca (Musa textilis) is a tree-like herb resembling the banana in appearance. The leaves of abaca...
  2. Buri palm

    Buri (Corypha elata) is the largest palm endemic in the Philippines. It is one of the...
  3. Coco coir

    Coco coir or the coconut fiber comes from the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), basically from the...
  4. Coconut palm

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is abundant anywhere in the Philippines at any time of the year....
  5. Coconut shell

    Coconut shell is a material from the fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). The shell...
  6. Cogon grass

    Cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica), also called silver hair grass or sword grass, belongs to the sweet grasses...
  7. Giant Bamboo

    Giant bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) belongs to the family of sweet grasses. It is one of the...
  8. Gmelina

    Gmelina (Gmelina arborea) is a fast growing plant, which grows on different localities and prefers moist...
  9. Lampakanay

    Lampakanay (Typha orientalis) is widely distributed all over the Philippine archipelago. It is abundant in low...
  10. Raffia

    Raffia comes from the young shoot or leaf of the buri palm. Two qualities of Raffia...
  11. Rattan

    Rattan (Calamus javensis), is a climbing vine abundant specifically in the southern part of the Philippines....
  12. Water hyacinth

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a free-floating perennial aquatic plant endemic to tropical and sub-tropical areas. With...

Cogon grass

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Cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica), also called silver hair grass or sword grass, belongs to the sweet grasses closely related to bamboo. The rhizome or stem of this perennial plant reaches up to 1.2 meters high with a diameter of about 1.5 millimeters. The leaves grow directly from creeping underground rhizomes, giving the plant a stem-less appearance. Cogon grass leaves have smooth or sometimes hairysheaths, with a membranous ligule. The leaves are slender, flat and possess serrated margins and an off-center prominent white mid-rib. Cogon grass can be very useful if it is used ecologically and sustainably. It settles in certain locations like roadsides, slopes and fallows and functions as floor binding agents or hedge rows that stabilise threatened surfaces and avoid soil erosion. The wooden stems of the cogon grass are very suitable for weaving mats, bags, carpets, etc. Applying the material for products not only promotes sustainable development but also provides economic gains to communities collecting the cogon grass.