1. Abaca

    Abaca (Musa textilis) is a tree-like herb resembling the banana in appearance. The leaves of abaca...
  2. Buri palm

    Buri (Corypha elata) is the largest palm endemic in the Philippines. It is one of the...
  3. Coco coir

    Coco coir or the coconut fiber comes from the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), basically from the...
  4. Coconut palm

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is abundant anywhere in the Philippines at any time of the year....
  5. Coconut shell

    Coconut shell is a material from the fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). The shell...
  6. Cogon grass

    Cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica), also called silver hair grass or sword grass, belongs to the sweet grasses...
  7. Giant Bamboo

    Giant bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) belongs to the family of sweet grasses. It is one of the...
  8. Gmelina

    Gmelina (Gmelina arborea) is a fast growing plant, which grows on different localities and prefers moist...
  9. Lampakanay

    Lampakanay (Typha orientalis) is widely distributed all over the Philippine archipelago. It is abundant in low...
  10. Raffia

    Raffia comes from the young shoot or leaf of the buri palm. Two qualities of Raffia...
  11. Rattan

    Rattan (Calamus javensis), is a climbing vine abundant specifically in the southern part of the Philippines....
  12. Water hyacinth

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a free-floating perennial aquatic plant endemic to tropical and sub-tropical areas. With...

Coconut shell

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Coconut shell is a material from the fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). The shell can be extracted by taking out the husk or the fruit cover. Dehusking, splitting and scraping are the processes needed to obtain the coconut shell alone. The outer husk, which also has commercial value and is used as material for the lifestyle industry, is removed and the eye of the fruit pierced to drain the juice. The nut is then split and the coco meat removed through scraping. The shell can be cut into different shapes and the possibility of various patterns and combinations for lamination is endless. When crushed and combined, shell laminates are at par with the quality and appearance of tortoise shell or ivory. A whole range of boxes, lamps, tabletops, chairs and household accessories using crushed and laminated shells have found acceptance in both local and foreign markets. Gluing small shell pieces to a wooden or metal surface to upgrade an otherwise simple material is one of the elegant uses for coconut shell. Shell lamination varies in colors from dark brown for mature shells, to honey or ivory white for young shells.