1. Abaca

    Abaca (Musa textilis) is a tree-like herb resembling the banana in appearance. The leaves of abaca...
  2. Buri palm

    Buri (Corypha elata) is the largest palm endemic in the Philippines. It is one of the...
  3. Coco coir

    Coco coir or the coconut fiber comes from the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), basically from the...
  4. Coconut palm

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is abundant anywhere in the Philippines at any time of the year....
  5. Coconut shell

    Coconut shell is a material from the fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). The shell...
  6. Cogon grass

    Cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica), also called silver hair grass or sword grass, belongs to the sweet grasses...
  7. Giant Bamboo

    Giant bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) belongs to the family of sweet grasses. It is one of the...
  8. Gmelina

    Gmelina (Gmelina arborea) is a fast growing plant, which grows on different localities and prefers moist...
  9. Lampakanay

    Lampakanay (Typha orientalis) is widely distributed all over the Philippine archipelago. It is abundant in low...
  10. Raffia

    Raffia comes from the young shoot or leaf of the buri palm. Two qualities of Raffia...
  11. Rattan

    Rattan (Calamus javensis), is a climbing vine abundant specifically in the southern part of the Philippines....
  12. Water hyacinth

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a free-floating perennial aquatic plant endemic to tropical and sub-tropical areas. With...

Coco coir

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Coco coir or the coconut fiber comes from the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), basically from the fruit. The color of the fiber can either be white or brown depending on the plant’s maturity. Those that are less than 10 months old produce white fiber while those that are already 12 to 16 months old produce brown fiber. Coir is mechanically extracted either by the wet milling process that involves retting or by the dry milling process that utilizes a special machine called “down decorticator”. The former is regarded as the “biological” method where the husks are soaked in water for some time, and the partial disintegration of the cementing tissue is induced through the action of microorganisms. The effect is the separation of the fiber from the husks. The dry milling process is considered to be the most efficient and convenient method, employing a machine, which beats the husk and scrapes the fiber. Depending on the type of machine, bristle (long) fibers or a combination of bristle and mattress (short) fibers are produced.